Roth IRA

Serving Southwest Florida

Helping clients plan for their family's future, by creating an efficient, thoughtful and comprehensive estate plan that preserves their legacy and gives them peace of mind.

Estate Planning Disasters

The potential of estate planning disasters looms in the near future.  One of the largest wealth transfers our nation has ever seen is about to occur, since in the next 25 years, roughly $68 trillion of wealth will be passed to succeeding generations. This event has unique planning opportunities for those who are prepared, and also big challenges due to the ever-changing legal and tax world of estate planning.

Fox Business’ article “5 estate planning disasters you’ll want to avoid,” discusses the biggest estate planning disasters to avoid.

Failing to properly name beneficiaries. This common estate planning mistake is easily overlooked, when setting up a retirement plan for the first time or when switching investment companies. A big advantage of adding a beneficiary to your account, is that the account will avoid probate and pass directly to your beneficiaries.

Any account with a properly listed beneficiary designation will override what is written in your will or revocable living trust. Therefore, you should review your investment and bank accounts to make certain that your beneficiaries are accurate and match your intentions.

Naming a minor as a beneficiary. This can be an estate planning disaster, if they are still minors when you die. A minor won’t have the legal authority to take control of inheritance or investment accounts until they reach the age of 18 or 21 (depending on state law). When a minor receives an asset as a beneficiary, a court-appointed guardianship will be created to supervise and manage the assets on behalf of the minor. To avoid this mistake, you can name a guardian for the minor child in your will.

Forgetting to fund a trust. Creating a trust is the first step, but many people don’t properly fund their trust after it’s established.  If you don’t transfer your assets to the trust, they will have to go through probate – a serious estate planning disaster.

Making a tax mess for your heirs. A significant advantages of passing on real estate or other highly appreciated investments or property, is that your beneficiaries receive what is known as a “step-up” in basis, so that they aren’t responsible for any income taxes on the appreciated assets when they are received. The exception is when inheriting retirement accounts, such as 401k’s and traditional IRAs. Except for a surviving spouse, inheriting a traditional IRA or 401k means that you are now responsible for the taxes owed. With the recent passage of the SECURE Act, most non-spouse beneficiaries must totally withdraw a 401k or IRA within 10 years. It is deemed to be ordinary income for beneficiaries, which could result in a huge tax bill for your heirs. To avoid this, you can convert some or all of your retirement account assets to a Roth IRA during your lifetime, which lets you to pay the conversion taxes at your current income tax rate—a rate that may be much lower than your children or grandchildren’s tax rate. When you pass away, any money that is passed inside a Roth IRA goes tax-free to your heirs, avoiding an estate planning disaster.

Failing to create a comprehensive estate plan. Properly establishing your estate plan now, will care for your loved ones financially, and can also save them a lot of emotional stress after you’re gone.

Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney about planning now. It can really affect your family for generations. It is one of the best gifts that you can leave your family.

Reference: Fox Business (Nov. 12, 2020) “5 estate planning disasters you’ll want to avoid”

The Biggest Estate Planning Mistakes

Heirs who are prepared to inherit wealth, with families who talk about wealth and have an estate plan, will do better than those who do not, says the West Haven Observer’s recent article “5 Estate planning disasters you’ll want to avoid.” A constantly changing legal and tax environment presents significant challenges, but a few simple steps may save your beneficiaries from the expense and stress of these common estate planning mistakes.

  1. Not designating beneficiaries properly. This is one of the most common estate planning mistakes, and one that cannot always be fixed. It’s easy to forget whose name you put on a pension or life insurance plan thirty years ago. However, failing to check those beneficiaries, especially if your life has undergone big changes, can lead to the wrong people enjoying the proceeds.

Using beneficiary designations is an excellent way to bypass the process of probate, since assets that pass this way are not subject to probate. Depending upon where you live, probate can be a long, drawn out process. A beneficiary designation is far simpler and more efficient.

Failing to name a beneficiary when setting up bank accounts, opening CDs, and savings accounts is a common error. This can be fixed by making these accounts “TOD,” or Transfer on Death, and the account goes directly to your beneficiary.

Your will does not control any beneficiary designations. That’s why this step is so important.

2-Designating a minor as a beneficiary. You love your grandchildren, but unless they are adults, they cannot inherit assets until they are 18 or 21, depending on the laws of your state. If a minor does receive an asset, the court appoints a guardian to supervise and manage the assets. Your estate planning attorney will advise you on your individual situation, but one alternative is to list a guardian for the minor child inside the will, so the court appoints the person who you choose to manage the property until the child becomes of age.

Another means of providing for young children or grandchildren is to create a trust. The trust names a trustee who is usually a trusted friend or relative who is knowledgeable and responsible. They manage the assets on behalf of the child. The trust also permits assets to pass without probate.

3-Failing to fund a trust. All too often, this estate planning mistake is the weak link that breaks the estate. Placing assets within the trust is called funding. Usually this means changing the ownership of bank accounts or real estate from being owned by an individual to being owned by the trust. If the trust is not funded and the will has instructions that seemingly contradict the trust, the asset will need to go through probate and the trust instructions will be ignored.

4-Leaving a tax nightmare for heirs. One of the many advantages of passing on real estate or other assets that appreciate that beneficiaries get a “step up” in basis. That means the heirs are not responsible for any income taxes on the appreciated assets. This can be a very big benefit. There are exceptions—inherited IRAs and 401(k)s don’t have this advantage. However, the recent passage of the SECURE Act has taken away many tax benefits for IRA heirs. Most non-spouse beneficiaries must fully withdraw the entire amount from the IRA or 401(k) within ten years, and the withdrawal is considered ordinary income. It could leave your heirs with a huge, unexpected tax bill.

There is a workaround. By converting some or perhaps all of your retirement accounts to a Roth IRA during your lifetime, you can pay the taxes when converting the IRA to a Roth IRA at your current tax rate, which may be lower than your children or grandchildren’s rate. When you die, any money in the Roth IRA goes to heirs completely tax free.

5-The biggest estate planning mistake of all is not having an estate plan. Thinking about your legacy plan, mortality and incapacity is not fun for anyone. However, by spending the time and resources in creating an estate plan, you spare your loved ones from an inordinate amount of stress and expenses, which they will appreciate. One of the best gifts you can give your loved ones is a well-thought out, properly created and executed estate plan.

Let us help you avoid estate planning mistakes.

Reference: West Haven Observer (Nov. 12, 2020) “5 Estate planning disasters you’ll want to avoid”

 

How to Catch Up on Retirement Savings

Many workers need to catch up on retirement savings because they haven’t created any plans to save for their retirement. However, you can start turning that situation around now. Money Talks News’ recent article entitled “The 7 Fastest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings” says that, even if you can’t add to retirement savings at the moment, here are some ideas to plan for how you’ll address this shortfall, when you’re back on your feet financially.

Review your budget. If you need more money for retirement savings, change your budget. Make certain that all your money is identified and working for you. Reduce or cut expenses that prevent you from achieving goals.

“Catch up” your 401(k). If you are over 50, take advantage of the ‘catch-up contribution’ in your 401(k). In 2020, the base limit for contributions to workplace retirement accounts is $19,500. In addition, starting at age 50, workers with a 401(k) plan can contribute an extra $6,500 per year. If you have an IRA — either traditional or Roth — you can contribute $6,000, plus an extra $1,000 beginning at age 50.

Leverage all investment opportunities. When you invest in your 401(k), put enough in to at least get any full employer matching funds. There are also employers that match contributions to a health savings account, which can be a great hidden way to save for retirement. You can also maximize IRA contributions (Roth or traditional), depending on what is possible given your income. Any money left over can be invested it in a taxable account.

Bolster your earnings. If you’re behind in saving for retirement, you might need to boost your earnings more quickly. To earn more income, consider changing jobs, get training to update your skills, or finding a side gig. If income doesn’t grow over time, it’s hard to have savings strategies accelerate retirement success.

Be wise with raises and windfalls. When you get a raise, split the amount and put half in a checking account and half toward retirement savings.

Minimize your spending. This can be the toughest part, but it’s also perhaps the most important. Reducing spending increases your savings, and it also teaches you to live with less. If you learn to live more modestly, you won’t need to save as much to continue your lifestyle in retirement. If you’re unsure where all your money is going, monitor your spending. List all the expenses and track them over time. When you know where your money is going, you’ll have the information needed to determine if there are places where spending can be diverted to savings.

Make a “mortgage payment” after the house is paid off. If you’ve worked hard to pay off the mortgage, save the money that was budgeted for the house. Save it in an investment account to use for retirement spending. Do the same when you pay off a car loan and watch your wealth grow.  We can help you with your estate planning in retirement.

Reference: Money Talks News (Oct. 8, 2020) “The 7 Fastest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings”