How to Catch Up on Retirement Savings

Many workers need to catch up on retirement savings because they haven’t created any plans to save for their retirement. However, you can start turning that situation around now. Money Talks News’ recent article entitled “The 7 Fastest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings” says that, even if you can’t add to retirement savings at the moment, here are some ideas to plan for how you’ll address this shortfall, when you’re back on your feet financially.

Review your budget. If you need more money for retirement savings, change your budget. Make certain that all your money is identified and working for you. Reduce or cut expenses that prevent you from achieving goals.

“Catch up” your 401(k). If you are over 50, take advantage of the ‘catch-up contribution’ in your 401(k). In 2020, the base limit for contributions to workplace retirement accounts is $19,500. In addition, starting at age 50, workers with a 401(k) plan can contribute an extra $6,500 per year. If you have an IRA — either traditional or Roth — you can contribute $6,000, plus an extra $1,000 beginning at age 50.

Leverage all investment opportunities. When you invest in your 401(k), put enough in to at least get any full employer matching funds. There are also employers that match contributions to a health savings account, which can be a great hidden way to save for retirement. You can also maximize IRA contributions (Roth or traditional), depending on what is possible given your income. Any money left over can be invested it in a taxable account.

Bolster your earnings. If you’re behind in saving for retirement, you might need to boost your earnings more quickly. To earn more income, consider changing jobs, get training to update your skills, or finding a side gig. If income doesn’t grow over time, it’s hard to have savings strategies accelerate retirement success.

Be wise with raises and windfalls. When you get a raise, split the amount and put half in a checking account and half toward retirement savings.

Minimize your spending. This can be the toughest part, but it’s also perhaps the most important. Reducing spending increases your savings, and it also teaches you to live with less. If you learn to live more modestly, you won’t need to save as much to continue your lifestyle in retirement. If you’re unsure where all your money is going, monitor your spending. List all the expenses and track them over time. When you know where your money is going, you’ll have the information needed to determine if there are places where spending can be diverted to savings.

Make a “mortgage payment” after the house is paid off. If you’ve worked hard to pay off the mortgage, save the money that was budgeted for the house. Save it in an investment account to use for retirement spending. Do the same when you pay off a car loan and watch your wealth grow.  We can help you with your estate planning in retirement.

Reference: Money Talks News (Oct. 8, 2020) “The 7 Fastest Ways to Catch Up on Retirement Savings”

 

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